Adult ADHD

To commiserate or not… Keep your friendships real.

funny-pictures-heres-a-rats-assI use social media to express my views of my world, to express my opinions on matters, but without attacking anybody directly. We all don’t always agree on everything and I always welcome constructive input from the people on my lists, that I regard as friends, because the view of the world as I have it may be a bit biased sometimes. I guess we can all say that. ūüôā

I  also have ADD, so the way I express myself may sometimes come across to sensitive viewers (PG16 and up) as harsh or too direct.  We live in a world where the only thing everybody wants to share is their happy feelings, their happy days, their happiness.  Nobody wants to post on their page they are having a bad day РWHAT WOULD THE WORLD THINK OF THEM!!!  I am not one of those people.

And so I USED TO belonged to a group in a Whatsapp. forum where all the girlfriends (About 30 or so) chatted, lent each other support, shared info and feelings etc. ¬†(only the happy stuff of course), unless you are a VALEDICTORIAN member, then everybody will commiserate with you, share in your troubles and offer to carry your load. ¬†I was not even close. ¬†I have a horrible sense of timing, because I work full time, raise my kids alone and I have had more than my share of medical problems in between to deal with. ¬†I… Continue reading

What is Adult ADD and how is it different from childhood ADHD / ADD?

Attention Deficit Disorder is a collection of specific traits that reflects or affects a person (or child’s)  natural neurological nature

ADD or ADHD signSome Positive traits include spontaneity, creativity and the ability to lock onto and hyper focus on tasks of the child’s own choosing. However, there are also some traits that may present some potential problems. These include selective attention, easily distracted, impulsive and sometimes hyperactivity.  Your child may exhibit some of these positive or negative traits, not necessarily all of them. Depending on how these are perceived and treated, the specific combination of your child’s traits can work to either their  advantage or disadvantage.

Pretty much all children are impulsive, easily distracted, and inattentive some of the time, but ADD children are like this most of the time. 

Attention Deficit Disorder is not just a problem in children.  If you were diagnosed with childhood ADD/ADHD, chances are, you’ve carried at least some of the symptoms into adulthood. But even if you were never diagnosed with ADD/ADHD as a child, it doesn’t mean you can’t be affected by it as an adult. Research shows in general that one in 33 adults or 4% of the total adult population in the world suffer with Attention Deficit Disorder.

ADD poses a lot of challenges and understanding why your child behaves in a certain way, will help you meet these challenges.

 

 

Some traits readily seen in children diagnosed with ADD / ADHD:

Living with ADD as an Adult

ADD focusI was diagnosed with ADD when I was 35 years old. ¬†I went to see my psychiatrist by referral due to my ongoing depression, and had no idea he was going to do anything other than listen to my sad stories and write a prescription for what I hoped was something to make the heavy stone I felt resting on my heart easier to bear. ¬†He asked a few random questions about my home life, my marital status, my kids about my work, and of course how “I felt about all that”.

I did what I always did.  I rambled on.  I guess (like I always do)  I was trying to cram as much into my allotted hour as I could to paint the clearest picture of my life to him without leaving out any major or minor detail that could lead him down the wrong path of diagnosis.  I told him about all my successful  and unsuccessful jobs, even the jobs I tried out for only a few days before deciding to move on!  I told him about my horrible home life as a child, about my loss of love as a grown up, and how my life lead me down the path I eventually followed.  When I was done rambling an eerie quiet ascended over the room.

Now I never have been, or never will be uncomfortable with a quiet lull in a conversation, but this one felt… Continue reading

The gift of ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder)

Growing up was a struggle for me.

I always seemed to be on another wavelength from everyone else.  I was a silent, shy and introverted little girl, that did not really fit in anywhere, so I always hovered around on the edges.

A dreamer.

girl frustrated with ADDGreat was my surprise when, in grade 6 I was one of the candidates to go to leadership camp for final selection to become a Prefect (or leader). ¬†We had to solve obstacle ¬†courses (almost like the reality show “survivor”) working in teams, and individually.

Well, if you know anything about ADD you would know that one of the biggest telltale signs is called weak impulse control (or as I like to put it no filters). ¬† ¬†Other people perceive things like risks, danger and morals as things that will make them stand back and take a second to think about what they are about to do, but an ADD or (ADHD) person sort of just jump in, they don’t really have those filters (they do have them, but don’t give it a second thought). ¬†Of course there are lots of sub – conditions that people with ADD can develop such as Obsessive Compulsive¬†Disorder¬†(this has nothing to do with being neat) – it is counting things, having to be in control of things, and having to do things a certain way.

This is both a good and bad thing while still at school. ¬†I came up… Continue reading

The Dark Dog of Depression

It’s like a dark dog that keeps yapping at your heels.¬†¬†Depression.

A much stigmatized word, for a very misunderstood medical condition.

My Husband has never had to suffer this, so he has no idea how to cope with mine.  The Shrink says it is part of my ADD Рa sub condition of sorts.depressed

Most days when the alarm goes off in the morning I lie in bed and instead of pulling the covers over my head (a very very strong reflex), I give myself a pep talk to get up.

Throughout my life I have learned that the worst that can happen to you is Рthat you may die, or get locked up in prison.  Then I compare my possible day to these scenarios Рand thankfully I have no real motivation to try and jump in front of a moving anything, and I have done nothing (yet) to deserve incarceration.

So I take a very deep breath, try and lift the (metaphorical) heavy stone that is resting on my chest and swing my legs off the bed to take a shower and get dressed for the day.

I have no real reason to feel this way, I just do. ¬†This is what people around me (and mostly me) don’t get. ¬†The chemical mix in my brain is out of balance and has to be medicated to use the right stuff and make more of it. ¬†… Continue reading